Month: March 2020

Corona Chronicles 2: Edie Sedgwick

New York City, 1966. 11:32 AM We were all ready to start shooting a new project when the news of the virus hit the front pages of every newspaper and magazine in town. I’ll admit that it was a welcome change from that bony British fake, Twiggy that keeps appearing everywhere. She’s like a fish that has been out of the refrigerator for too long: she stinks. Everyone knows she’s copying me. The hair? The style? The makeup? It all screams Edie. And for heaven’s sake, that androgynous look is not appealing to anyone. Someone please send her a memo.  For the first time we were going to step outside the walls of The Factory to a darling little cottage upstate that belongs to my father but instead, New York went rogue. The streets are empty, the shops are closed, the life is gone and the city has actually gone to sleep. The first week of the shutdown I dove head first into all the obvious rituals that I could have sworn would keep me …

Corona Chronicles 1: Dora Maar

The Corona Chronicles is a column, contributed through a first-person essay, where deceased artists, muses and art world personalities vent about how their lives have been altered and interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Drastic times call for creative measures.  Paris, 1936. 7:30 AM Pablo and I were still in bed, naked and sweaty (yes, from exactly what you’re imagining), sipping a cup of lavender tea and devouring a croissant when we heard the newspaper boy shouting the day’s headlines: “Deadly virus infecting people left and right, read all about it!” Oh mon dieu! I quietly thought to myself. The world can’t end while our love is just beginning to blossom. Although Pablo is still married to Marie-Therese, I have always been sure that he will leave that blonde bob for me. He can’t resist the seduction and masochism that comes out of my pores…  When I first heard that the government was endorsing this social distancing thing I thought this cannot be, I am a photographer, a muse, a painter, a poet – I need …

Part 1: A Little History of the Art Market

Have you ever wondered how an art market even came into existence? I’ll tell you. And I will start from the very beginning: from the emergence of the art object to the birth of auctions, patrons, artists, academies and professional art dealers. Sit tight boys and girls, your history lesson is about to start in two parts (so that I don’t saturate your mind with way too much fascinating information). Part 1.0 Let’s start off with a fun fact: the Venus of Berekhat Ram (700,000 – 290,000 BC) is considered to be the first art object ever in the history of art objects. It was actually discovered not long ago in the Golan Heights by an archeologist in 1981. It is essentially a small rock that looks like a pregnant woman and it is believed that it was created during the Stone Age most probably by Homo Erectus (WOW!). But there’s no evidence of any trend of cultural collecting  in societies at this point in time so we can assume that artists were not competing with each other. As a result …

Part 2: A Little History of the Art Market

After the longest nap in the history of the naps – that had to be taken by force thanks to none other than Christianity – the ‘art market’ woke up with the early Renaissance in the 14th century. Two novelties had taken place: on one hand people had developed a new taste, almost a fetish, for finely bound books that developed into a whole other complex market. On the other, Medieval guilds were still regulating the quality of art which partially castrated individualism amongst artists. But among all this, in Florence, a hero was born. Hello Giotto – the absolute most important painter of the early Renaissance who introduced perspective and the third dimension to painting.  Yes, that is why painting is what it is today. Basically, and he changed the rules of the game for everyone. At the same time, a new type of art patron emerged. The most well known were the… come on, you know who… Their name starts with an ‘M’ and ends with ‘edici”. It was a Florentine family of merchant …