Art

Corona Chronicles 3: La Gioconda

Written by my friend, Clara Zabludowsky, who found inspiration on a park in London. March 4th, 1504. Day 7 of the lockdown. Florence, Italy This was not the plan. It was supposed to be a quick two-day sitting. A sketch to honor the birth of Andrea, a little memento per se to mark the oh so magical moment when I became a mother for the second time. By the way only a man would think that this makes a good push present. “Why don’t you go put your postpartum body in a girdle and sit still in a stuffy old room that stinks of paint for 8 hours.” Great idea Francesco. How about a wet nurse instead? Or just some flowers for God’s sake… No need to get creative. But instead the quarantine caught me here, stuck with this weirdo Leonardo in this room full of strange things and no matter how much I have wanted to leave, I can’t leave. The caribinieri are patrolling the streets and arresting anyone that is as much as going for …

Corona Chronicles 2: Edie Sedgwick

New York City, 1966. 11:32 AM We were all ready to start shooting a new project when the news of the virus hit the front pages of every newspaper and magazine in town. I’ll admit that it was a welcome change from that bony British fake, Twiggy that keeps appearing everywhere. She’s like a fish that has been out of the refrigerator for too long: she stinks. Everyone knows she’s copying me. The hair? The style? The makeup? It all screams Edie. And for heaven’s sake, that androgynous look is not appealing to anyone. Someone please send her a memo.  For the first time we were going to step outside the walls of The Factory to a darling little cottage upstate that belongs to my father but instead, New York went rogue. The streets are empty, the shops are closed, the life is gone and the city has actually gone to sleep. The first week of the shutdown I dove head first into all the obvious rituals that I could have sworn would keep me …

Corona Chronicles 1: Dora Maar

The Corona Chronicles is a column, contributed through a first-person essay, where deceased artists, muses and art world personalities vent about how their lives have been altered and interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Drastic times call for creative measures.  Paris, 1936. 7:30 AM Pablo and I were still in bed, naked and sweaty (yes, from exactly what you’re imagining), sipping a cup of lavender tea and devouring a croissant when we heard the newspaper boy shouting the day’s headlines: “Deadly virus infecting people left and right, read all about it!” Oh mon dieu! I quietly thought to myself. The world can’t end while our love is just beginning to blossom. Although Pablo is still married to Marie-Therese, I have always been sure that he will leave that blonde bob for me. He can’t resist the seduction and masochism that comes out of my pores…  When I first heard that the government was endorsing this social distancing thing I thought this cannot be, I am a photographer, a muse, a painter, a poet – I need …

Part 1: A Little History of the Art Market

Have you ever wondered how an art market even came into existence? I’ll tell you. And I will start from the very beginning: from the emergence of the art object to the birth of auctions, patrons, artists, academies and professional art dealers. Sit tight boys and girls, your history lesson is about to start in two parts (so that I don’t saturate your mind with way too much fascinating information). Part 1.0 Let’s start off with a fun fact: the Venus of Berekhat Ram (700,000 – 290,000 BC) is considered to be the first art object ever in the history of art objects. It was actually discovered not long ago in the Golan Heights by an archeologist in 1981. It is essentially a small rock that looks like a pregnant woman and it is believed that it was created during the Stone Age most probably by Homo Erectus (WOW!). But there’s no evidence of any trend of cultural collecting  in societies at this point in time so we can assume that artists were not competing with each other. As a result …

Part 2: A Little History of the Art Market

After the longest nap in the history of the naps – that had to be taken by force thanks to none other than Christianity – the ‘art market’ woke up with the early Renaissance in the 14th century. Two novelties had taken place: on one hand people had developed a new taste, almost a fetish, for finely bound books that developed into a whole other complex market. On the other, Medieval guilds were still regulating the quality of art which partially castrated individualism amongst artists. But among all this, in Florence, a hero was born. Hello Giotto – the absolute most important painter of the early Renaissance who introduced perspective and the third dimension to painting.  Yes, that is why painting is what it is today. Basically, and he changed the rules of the game for everyone. At the same time, a new type of art patron emerged. The most well known were the… come on, you know who… Their name starts with an ‘M’ and ends with ‘edici”. It was a Florentine family of merchant …

Blooming Mavericks in a World of Giants

This article was commissioned by and for Inside the Burger Collection and it was published in Art Asia Pacific in May 2018. Read it here. Nothing sounds more gratifying than making a living from selling art, right? The mere thought of spending your days surrounded by works that nurture your soul and spark your creativity make my hairs stand on end. The idea of supporting Art History, contributing your tiny grain of sand, traveling the world all year long attending art fairs and biennales, getting caught up in mind-blowing conversations with curious, like-minded nomads such as yourself is so romantic. All the while, you’re selling the work of artists you are passionate about that in turn allow you to live a full, exciting and comfortable life.  But having your own gallery is no walk in the park, and the job of a gallerist is the toughest one of all.  Enter Maria Bernheim: an art world wonder-woman of many talents. Petite, ambitious, dynamic, knowledge-hungry and sassy. Born in Romania but raised in Paris, Maria grew up …

Vicky, Christina, BARCELONA (minus Vicky & Christina)

Contributed with sass and love by Marcela Velez – Born in Colombia, bread in Costa Rica. Left the nest at 18 for NYC and to study in Parsons but she’s called Barcelona her home since 2012 when she co-founded and launched the sensational M2Malletier handbag house.  Secret of adulthood: nothing cures a hangover like pasta and arepas. Rise & Shine –  For breakfast head to Auto Rosellón – it’s in Calle Enrique Granado – one of my favorite streets filled with mosaics and colors.  The restaurant looks super simple but inside it has amazing design details such as their lamps. The menu is fixed but it has seasonal dishes. The kitchen is tiny, the majority of it is exposed, and you’ve never seen more savory-looking veggies in your life. Take a walk on the wild side –  My favorite area is The Raval which is the immigrants’ neighborhood, it’s full of street art and I walk through there every day to go to SoHo house. This area is fascinating because this is a neighborhood where immigrant cultures clash, converge and co-exist: you see …

BOGOTÁ: 2600 Meters Closer to the Stars

Contributed with love and by Kelly Talamas – an Editor and Creative Director, who has called Miami, Mexico and now, Colombia her home. You can find her work in the Mexican and Latin American version of Vogue. The last ten years working at the title have taken her on trips all around the region, making her an expert on the creative scenes around the Latin capitals. She appreciates qualitative, locally made design, a good boutique hotel, travel photography, and old school hip hop. Ask her to rap, and you might be pleasantly surprised. Rise and Shine –  My favorite morning plan is taking a long walk around the Parque Virrey, a luscious green oasis in the Chicó neighborhood. About halfway through the park you’ll find Canasto, a cute café nestled into a corner with an outdoor terrace that looks onto the crowds outside. The terrace is conveniently covered, since rain is a constant in the city. I opt for one of my preferred dishes – the mango and piña bowl, the avocado on beet toast or the banana and …

Cubism: The Mother of it All

As an art historian and a self-proclaimed lover/groupie/fan to the core of Modern art, I am a bit embarrassed to say that I just realized just how important my least favorite art movement was in the grand History of art. I´m talking about Cubism. Are you rolling your eyes too? For the record, it’s still and will always be my least favorite “ism” in all of the “isms” (Impressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, Expressionism, etc.) but damn did it change the course of art. To start, let’s reiterate for the 999 trillionth time that Picasso was a genius. Yes he was an arrogant, selfish, egocentric, ladies man but thankfully we’re not any of the girls whose hearts he broke. And let’s be honest, all those affairs just make him so much more fun to read about. Picasso, or as I like to call him, Pablito, painted Les Demoiselle D’Avignon in 1907. For those of you who have a huge question mark on your face, this is one of the most important works of art ever to be produced. That’s right, I …

MANILA: Made With Spice

Contributed with love by cousins Nina Paradies & Sofia Aboitiz – two thirds of the dynamic trio that founded FINI, an apparel line inspired by their love of their home country and born out of their desire to foster local talent, revive fading traditions, and improve business practices. Both based in Manila, Nina is surf-loving foodie, while Sofi is interior design-obsessed, mother of Antonio – her french bulldog, and between good sleep and food, she would always choose the latter. The truest Filipino breakfast of champs – Nina: Breakfast at Antonio’s is by far my favorite place for my first meal of the day—the only catch is that it is outside of Manila in the mountain town of Tagaytay. Roadtrip! On a good day with no traffic you’ll get there in an hour. If you have a few days to burn in Manila it is very much worth it, the food is great and the views of Taal Volcano are even better. If you don’t have much time in Manila then you can’t really go wrong at Wildflour. Sofi: Wildflour! They have lots of savory and sweet options and are conveniently located …

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